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Alfred Russel Wallace [1823-1913]

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Definition: English naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace is probably most remembered as the scientist who wrote Charles Darwin in 1858 about his own ideas on natural selection, forcing Darwin to publish On the Origin of Species. Wallace's primary research area during the 1850s was the Indonesian archipelago, although he also worked along the Amazon river of South America. Wallace's Line is the name given to a disconformity of animals Wallace noticed at the Indonesian archipelago; animals south of the line (Australia) were different than those north, leading Wallace to natural selection. For this Wallace is known as the father of zoogeography. The most famous of his numerous books are probably Darwinism (1889) and The Malay Archipelago (1869).

This glossary entry is part of the Dictionary of Archaeology. Sources for the term include the references listed on the front page of the Dictionary, and the websites listed in the sidebar.

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