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Ceramics

The archaeological study of pottery vessels and production techniques of the past.
  1. Brick and Tile (4)
  2. Figurines and Clay Pipes (3)
  3. Pottery Vessels (16)

Dragon Kiln in Carolina
In the early decades of the 19th century, entrepreneur brothers Abner and John Landrum brought Chinese technological innovation, and the forms and styles of an international set of workers, to create a new durable and safe form of stoneware in South Carolina

Picol Passo and the Art of Maiolica
This discussion on the history of maiolica ceramics is a must-read for late-medieval fans of ceramics. This article originally appeared in the Steven Goldate's Ceramics at About page, and I'm grateful to him for bringing it to my attention.

The Potters of San Ildefonso
The beautiful American Indian pottery of San Ildefonso pueblo found in museums in Santa Fe is the work of the descendants of Tewa potter Maria Martinez, assisted by that insensitive clod, archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewett.

A Little Place for Your Stuff: Ceramics in Archaeology
Ceramic pottery is one of the distinctive forms of artifact produced by prehistoric peoples. Both utilitarian and artwork, pottery will always be a subject for serious study by the archaeologist.

The Invention of Pottery
Of all the kinds of artifacts which may be found at archaeological sites, ceramics is surely one of the most important. Ceramic artifacts are extremely durable, and may last tens of thousands of years virtually unchanged from the date of manufacture. And, ceramic artifacts, unlike stone tools, are completely person-made, shaped of clay and purposely fired.

Dave the Potter
Dave the Potter, also known as Dave the Slave, Dave of the Hive and, after Emancipation, David Drake, was one of the dozens of African-American ceramicists worked in the Edgefield potteries of South Carolina. But he was also definitely unique.

Pottery History
Pottery is the creation of storage and cooking vessels by firing clay-enriched earth. The technology is at least 20,000 years old, and the history includes millennia of innovation and collaboration.

Edgefield Pottery
The potters of the Edgefield pottery in South Carolina were important innovators who combined techniques, glazes, slips, pottery forms and decoration from all over the world.

Ceramic Petrology
From Alan Vince, a good discussion of the scientific technique.

Corpus Informático del Instrumentum Domesticum
From CEIPAC at la Universitat de Barcelona, a catalog of epigraphic data on Roman amphorae. Substantial resources in Gran Bretaña, Alemania y Holanda; se ha iniciado la relativa a Francia, Suiza, Austria, España, Portugal e Italia. Spanish.

Gather Around this Pot
From the Canadian Museum of Civilisation, a flat-out wonderful resource with detailed discussion and photographs of specific pots, descriptions of manufacturing methods, and cultural associations of Woodland ceramics in Canada.

Expérimentations Archéologiques
From the Association pour les Journées de la Céramique, experiments in ceramic vessel firing, using both Neolithic and Bronze Age type kilns. French.

The Perseus Project
A substantial collection of ceramic vases from the ancient Greek world, from Tufts University.

Spoilheap's Introduction to Ceramics
A basic introduction to pottery in archaeology, focusing particularly on the ceramics of the medieval period.

Pit Firing Ceramics: A Book Review
Pit Firing Ceramics is an intriguing, heavily illustrated book by Dawn Whitehand, exploring the various methods and philosophies of the modern use of an ancient pottery making technique of pit kilns.

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