1. Education
Send to a Friend via Email

Computer Programs for Archaeologists

There are a number of very useful utility programs for archaeologists on the web, many of which are freeware. Whether its running a Harris Matrix or calibrating a c14 date, here's a selection of the best software available.

ArchEd
From Max Planck Institute, a software program to build Harris Matrices.

Cal-Pal
A radiocarbon calibration package developed by the University of Cologne to "support research on hominid behavioural response to pleistocene climate change."

Ox-Cal
By Christopher Bronk Ramsay of Oxford, a program to provide radiocarbon calibration and analysis of archaeological and environmental stratigraphy.

PitCalc
While it's standard archaeological practice to work in square holes, sometimes it's simply not possible. PitCalc is an ancient (well, 20 years old) computer program brought back to java life to help us out in those situations.

Proleg Harris Matrix Builder
Reported to be "a unique software for archaeologists that automatically generates a fully customizable and error-free Harris Matrix taking into account all context chronologies"; but I haven't tried it yet.

Site Recorder
Site Recorder 4 is a GIS-based software program to assist in mapping maritime, freshwater and intertidal archaeological sites, and is used during site investigation for data collection as well as post-excavation analysis.

StratiGraf
From Pròleg, DPC, a statistical documentation and interpretation program for archaeologists; includes a Harris Matrix generator.

TFQA: Tools for Quantitative Archaeology
Keith Kintigh's statistical package specifically tailored for archaeological studies is available in individual or site licenses.

The Harris Matrix
The classic statistical method for diagramming stratigraphic sequences; this site is intended to "provide an international focal point for information and discussion."

Win-BASP
A Windows-based version of the enormously useful BASP program, by Irwin Scollar, including more than 60 functions for seriation, clustering, correspondance analysis, and other tools for archaeologists.

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.