1. Education
Send to a Friend via Email

Archaeology: Most Popular Articles

These articles are the most popular over the last month.
Ancient Art Built out of the Landscape
Geoglyphs are works of art that were made from moving or arranging stones or earth on a landscape.
When Did People Begin Using and Controlling Fire?
The discovery of fire was one of the earliest discoveries of humans. Fire's purposes are multiple, some of which are to add light and heat, to cook plants and animals, to clear forests for planting, to heat-treat stone for making stone tools, to burn clay for ceramic objects.
The 10 Most Important Aztec Gods and Goddesses
Learn more about the most important Aztec gods and and the religion of the Aztec people
What Is History, Anyway? A Handful of...
Drop in on a collection of quotes from historians--some professional, some decidedly not--trying their hand at defining the dark art of history.
Is Your Cat Truly Domesticated? According to...
The modern day cat was permanently domesticated about 4000 years ago, in Egypt; but archaeologists say it may have been closer to 10,000 years ago.
What You've Always Wanted to Know about Otzi...
The Iceman is the name of a 5,300-year-old human body discovered high in the Swiss/Italian Alps in 1991.
What Does A.D. Mean, Anyway?
The initials A.D. (used with or without periods) is an abbreviation for the Latin
Where Was the Ancient City of Babylon?
The archaeological site of Babylon was the capital of a small city state of Mesopotamia, named Babylonia, located in what is now Iraq, near the modern town of Hilla.
What Can Archaeology Tell Us About Who Aryans...
The Aryan Invasion Myth was developed in the late 19th century to explain the blossoming of the Indus River Civilization; but it stems from a flawed argument and old fashioned racist supremacism.
Here's How Cattle Came to Be Domesticated
Although evidence for hunting wild forms of cattle exists at archaeological sites dated to our earliest days on the planet, herding cattle was first accomplished in Western Asia by about 6000 BC, and in perhaps the eastern Sahara desert about 1000 years earlier.
Animal Domestication: When and Where It First...
Domestication is the process of genetically adapting an animal or plant to better suit the needs of human beings; this page includes a definition of domestication and a table of domestication dates for animals in the world.
A Beginner's Guide to the Stone Age
A definition and chronology of the Stone Age (more commonly known to scholars as the Paleolithic era), which in human prehistory is the name given to the period between about 2.5 million and 20,000 years ago.
What was Life in Europe Like Before Farming?
The Mesolithic period in European history includes the history of the complex hunter-gatherers who developed the technology to cultivate crops.
The New Seven Wonders of the World
A quick photo tour of the new seven wonders of the world--plus some extras that readers say should be in there, too.
Why Don't Archaeologists Use the Term...
Cro-Magnons are what scholars now call Anatomically Modern Humans or Early Modern Humans, mostly because Cro-Magnon refers to to a specific archaeological site which isn't really typical of the rest
How Hunter-Gatherers Lived Off the Land
Hunter gatherers is the name anthropologists have given to people who rely on a combined living of hunting game and gathering root vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Hunting and gathering was the lifestyle of all human beings until the invention of agriculture about 8000 years ago; and, to state it simply, hunter-gatherers hunt game and collect plant foods.
The Top Ten
Short list of the main facts and aspects of Aztec culture
What Is a Hominin and How Is It Different from...
Learn more about the Homininae subfamily, including Hominini (humans and their ancestors), Panini (chimps), and Gorillini (gorillas).
How Mesopotamian Accounting Led to the First...
Proto-cuneiform is the transitional written language of Uruk period accounting in Mesopotamia, between Neolithic clay tokens and literary cuneiform.
Tenochtitlan: How a City in a Swamp Became the...
The Aztec culture site called Tenochtitlan was located in a very peculiar place today, in a marsh in the middle of a lake surrounded by mountains--a place now called Mexico City.
What Does the Abbreviation 'BP' Stand for in...
Archaeologists use the term 'BP' to mean 'years before humans began to screw up the atmosphere by testing nuclear devices'.
Plant Domestication
A collection of plant histories, when and where humans domesticated them, with a table of dates and places and links to the stories themselves.
How the Dog Came to Be Domesticated
When and where the partnership of dog and humans first occurred is currently under considerable debate.
Learn All about Maya Civilization with This...
Facts about the economics, politics, warfare, rituals, architecture, and other interesting things to know about the Maya Civilization. Page 3.
Learn All About the Ancient Mesopotamian City...
The Mesopotamian city of Ur, known as Tell al-Muqayyar, was an important Sumerian city state between about 2025-1738 BC.
Interested in a Career in Archaeology? Read...
Have you always dreamed of being an archaeologist, but don't know how to become one? To become an archaeologist takes education, reading, training, and persistence. Here's how you can get started exploring that dream job
10 Breathtaking Photos of Machu Picchu
The residential palace of the Inca king Pachacuti has drawn tourists from all over the world because of its lovely impossible location at the edge of the world. Gina Carey was at Machu Picchu during the Summer of 2004, and shares her photographs with us.
What is the Evidence for a 6th Century Fog...
The dust veil of AD 536 was a period of a year to 18 months when the world experienced some kind of calamity, and historic records and dendrochronological records from around the world hold the evidence.
How Ancient Civilizations Used Bitumen (AKA Tar)
Bitumen is a naturally-occurring organic byproduct of decomposed organic materials used by humans for many very useful things for the past 40,000 years.
The Legend of the Aztec God of War and Sacrifice
Huitzilopochtli, the Aztec god of war and sacrifice, learn more about Aztec mythology and religion
Considering a Career in Archaeology? Read These...
What kind of job can I get in archaeology? Does it pay well? Do you have to work when it's hot? These are the questions that everyone who is thinking about being an archaeologist wants to know.
Out of Africa Hypothesis
The Out of Africa or African Replacement Hypothesis argues that every living human being is descended from a small group in Africa.
How the Kingdom of Aksum Flourished in Ethiopia
The Kingdom of Aksum (first through sixth centuries AD) was one of the most powerful kingdoms in sub-Saharan Africa, connecting the Roman empire and the rest of the world in the region of the Red Sea.
Important Facts You Should Know About...
A few important facts about Neandertals, part of an intensive study guide about these human ancestors. Page 2.
Here's How Chickens Became Domesticated
The history of chickens and when they were domesticated is something of a puzzle, but most likely it was about 8,000 years ago in Thailand.
The Origins of Agriculture Around the World
The history of farming begins some 12,000 years ago, in the hilly flanks of the Zagros Mountains of southwest Asia
Who were the Ancient Mississippians?
The Mississippian culture is what archaeologists call the precolumbian horticulturalists and mound builders, who were spread across the American midwest and southeast, between about AD 1000-1550.
Is the history of the Inca written in knotted...
The quipu (also spelled khipu or quipo) is the only known precolumbian information system in South America.
Who doesn't want to be an archaeologist when...
What kind of real-life career choices do I have with a degree in archaeology?
Top 10 Ancient American Civilizations
The continents of North and South America were 'discovered' by the European civilizations in the late 15th century AD, but their civilizations were vast and complex long before the first European landed. The following are a taste of the complexity of the civilizations of ancient America.
Here Are the Basic Facts and Timeline of the...
After classical Egypt, the first civilization in Africa was called Kush or Kushite, located on the third cataract of the Nile River in what is now the Sudan.
Artifacts of the Royal Cemetery of Ur
The bull-headed lyre discovered at the Royal Cemetery of Ur likely belonged to a musician, buried with one of the retainers in an elite burial.
Archaeology of the Minotaur, Ariadne and Daedalus
The Palace of Minos, excavated by Arthur Evans, is a standard Minoan palace of extraordinary size, begun during the prepalatial period of the Minoan civilization.
The Amazing History of American Corn
class="no-js" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article" > itemprop="description" >Maize ( Zea mays
The Secret Innovations and Inventions of...
Ancient farming methods used by farmers throughout the world varied quite a bit. Farmers developed many ways to maintain soils, ward off frost and freeze cycles and protect their crops from animals. On this page you'll find core concept definitions, articles on examples of archaeological research into ancient farming, detailed examination of some special farming techniques and bibliographies of related topics.
What is the Importance of the Maya Book Known...
The Popol Vuh, often dubbed the Bible of the Maya, is a colonial document which narrates the creation myth of the Maya Quiché of Guatemala and the Story of the Hero Twins
Cultural Evolution
Cultural evolution is the theory that culture changes over time as an adaptive response to stimulus.
The Narmer Palette: Early Period Ancient Egypt
The Narmer Palette is an early Period Egyptian civilization artifact, showing the conquest of Upper and Lower Egypt by the first Egyptian pharaoh, Menes or Narmer.
The Science of Building Ancient Cold-Weather...
Architecture of the ancient Paleo-Eskimo and Neo-Eskimo communities in the polar region of America reflected both the environment and social demands.
What Society Cultivated Wheat First?
Wheat was one of the very first crops domesticated by our ancestors, some 10,000 years ago in southeastern Turkey.
Clovis May Not Have Been First in the Americas,...
Clovis refers to mobile big game hunters who roamed the Americas hunting elephants and bison for a very brief time 12,000 years ago.
A Beginner's Guide to the Persian Empire
At its height about 500 BC, the Persian empire had conquered Asia as far as the Indus River, Greece, and North Africa including what is now Egypt and Libya.
Bog Bodies
The term bog bodies is used to refer to human burials, some likely sacrificed, recovered from peat bogs of Denmark, Germany, Holland, Britain, and Ireland.
Aztec Origins
This page describes the mythical and archaeological origins of the Aztec people, and the founding of their capital city of Tenochtitlán
The Collapse of Angkor
The end of the Khmer Empire (or Angkor civilization) came about as a direct result of the civilization's inability to adapt to an extended drought brought about by climate change.
Heat Treatment
Heat treatment in stone tool making (or flint knapping) refers to the controlled use of fire on raw lithic material to improve its flaking quality.
What Great Leap Forward does the Levallois...
Levallois is the name archaeologists have given to a distinctive flint knapping technique, which makes up part of the ancient Acheulean and Mousterian artifact assemblages.
Learn All About the Dating Techniques Used to...
A short course on the various dating methods used in archaeological science over the centuries. Part 1: Relative Dating
What Is Stratigraphy?
In archaeology, the study of stratigraphy involves looking at the geological and archaeological layers that make up an archaeological deposit to better understand the processes that created the site.
How did Medieval Armorers Fit Out the...
Resurrecting Richard III, a new video from PBS Secrets of the Dead, demonstrates how Medieval armorers dressed a king with a curved and twisted spine.
The Bering Land Bridge, Peopling America, and...
The Bering Land Bridge allowed human population into the Americas some 15,000 years ago: and scholars suggest it may partly regulate global climates.
Olmec Timeline and Definition
A guide to the Olmec civilization, including timelines, important sites, important facts, subsistence and settlement, burning issues, and a bibliography
The Moche Culture
The Moche culture was a South American society, whose sites were located along the arid coast of what is now Peru between 100 and 800 AD
The Rise and Fall of the Minoan Civilization
We don't really know what the Minoans called themselves--the ancient early Bronze Age culture in Greece was named for the legendary King Minos.
What Alchemy Did it Take to Make Medieval...
Damascus steel, the legendary steel blade scimitar of the Islamic side in the Crusades, was a formidable piece of weaponry for the middle ages. Modern science has given us new insights into how this iron metal was forged, and why this useful technology became lost.
Why Would Anybody Domesticate a Goat?
Beginning about 10,500-10,800 years ago, Neolithic farmers in the Near East began keeping small herds of goats for their milk, meat, dung, as well as for materials for clothing and building: hair, bone, and sinew.
Mayan Economics
The Mayan civilization had an extensive economic system based on trade and agriculture. Here are some details of that system.
Mysterious Artworks in the Atacama Desert of...
There are over 5,000 prehistoric geoglyphs in the Atacama Desert, and like the Nazca lines, they are mysterious, beautiful and awe-inspiring. Although we can't know the entire reason they were built, researcher Luis Briones believes they are part sign post and part story-telling along a transportation network in an ancient form of combined religious and commercial travel.
Mount Sandel, Ireland
Mount Sandel is the name of a small cluster of the oldest houses in Ireland, first built about 9,000 years ago. The seven small circular huts housed a small group, probably a nuclear family, as they fished and hunted on the banks of the River Bann at Coleraine.
Important Facts about the Olmec
Facts about the Olmec concerning their colossal heads of stone, their written language, their rituals, their artwork. Page 3.
Islamic Civilization
The Islamic Civilization is in reality an amalgam of wide variety of cultures, from North Africa to the western periphery of the Pacific Ocean, and from Central Asia to sub-Saharan Africa.
The Ancient Vikings Were Not the Best of...
The ancient Vikings were undoubtedly raiders: in that the History Channel series is correct. But they were so much more interesting than television tells us...
Myth-busting About Arrowheads
Arrowheads are often the subject of a number of myths, legends and misconceptions; here is a description of the top myths and the top unknown facts.
Remote Sensing
Remote sensing refers to sensing or imaging of distant phenomena.
What Science Knows about the Culture and...
The Inca were the largest pre-hispanic empire of South America when it was 'discovered' by the Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century AD.
How Did All the Little Piggies Get to Market?
Pigs (Sus scrofa) were domesticated in the Fertile Crescent about 11,000 years ago, but that's not the only place humans changed wild animals into a nicely behaved, edible food crop.
What Archaeologists Have Learned about the City...
Jericho (also called Tell es-Sultan) is the name of tell situated on an ancient lake bed plain in what is known as the West Bank, in the territory belonging to Palestine.
What Does the Term 'Material Culture' Mean?
: The term "material culture" is often used by archaeologists as a non-specific way to refer to the artifacts
Indus Civilization Timeline and Description
The Indus is one of the oldest societies we know of, including over 2600 known archaeological sites located along the Indus and Sarasvati rivers.
How Many Times Do You Need to Domesticate Sheep?
The sheep (Ovis aries) is one of the earliest animals ever domesticated, from the mouflon and more than 10,000 years ago.
Was the Upper Paleolithic the Height of...
The Upper Paleolithic period saw great changes in the world as Homo sapiens became the only hominid running around on our planet.
Tlaloc, the Aztec Rain God
Tlaloc, the rain god, was one of the most important gods in Aztec religion
Heinrich Schliemann and the Discovery of Troy
Heinrich Schliemann, that quintessential archaeologist of the 19th century, claimed to have discovered the real site of Troy. But did he?
The Three Sisters: Ancient Conservation Farming...
The Three Sisters were what Native American groups called the combined intercropping of maize, beans and squash. Recent scientific research has shown what a stroke of genius this combination was, on many health and environmental methods.
Guide to Pre-Clovis
Pre-Clovis is the name archaeologists have given to the oldest and now fairly well-established human occupations of the Americas.
Lascaux Cave
Lascaux Cave is a rockshelter in the Dordogne Valley of France with fabulous cave paintings, dated to between 15,000 and 17,000 years ago. Sadly, it is no longer open to the public.
Need Ideas for an Archaeology Paper? Try These...
The hardest thing a student does is pick a research paper topic. Archaeology, the study of a million years of human behavior, is an excellent starting place.
Did the Aztecs Really Think Cortes was the...
The Aztec god Quetzalcoatl, the Feathered Serpent, is one of the most famous pre-Columbian deity and his cult was widespread in many Mesoamerican cultures.
Who Were the Vikings, Anyway?
The Vikings were a farming culture, who originated in Scandinavia about the 4th century AD, and began to spread out and conquer the Europe in the 9th century AD. They were mostly defeated or subsumed into other cultures by the 13th century AD.
How Long Have Horses Been Our Pards?
The history of the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) is complex, the results of the spread of this marvelous creature throughout the world.
What genius culture first thought of fermenting...
Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes; and depending on your definition of
Lucy (Hominid at AL 288, Ethiopia)
Lucy is the name of the nearly complete skeleton of an Australopithecus afarensis, found in 1974 at AL 288, a site in the Hadar archaeological region on the Afar Triangle of Ethiopia.
When was the Common Bean Domesticated? And Who...
The common bean comes in a multitude of colors shapes and sizes, and as you've no doubt been told, they're really good for you. They are an American domesticate, and their domestication history is an interesting one...
Pacific Coast Migration Model
The Pacific Coast Migration Model is a theory concerning the original colonization of the Americas that proposes that people entering the continents followed the Pacific coastline
Post-Processual Archaeology
Post-Processual Archaeology is...
Pharaoh Hatshepsut's Deir el-Bahri
Hatshepsut's Deir el-Bahri (also spelled Deir el-Bahari) is one of the most beautiful temples in Egypt, built by the architects of Queen Hatshepsut, a pharaoh of the New Kingdom.
Ochre
The natural yellow-red-brown pigment known as ochre was humankind's first paint pot, used by our hominid ancestors nearly 300,000 years ago.
If you could be a Viking, would you be a...
Viking society is traditionally described as highly stratified, with three classes as written into mythology, slaves (thrall), farmers (karl), and aristocracy (jarl or earl)V
Mesoamerican Ball Game
The Mesoamerican ball game was an exciting, dangerous game played by most cultures in central America.
Aztec Religion
The Aztecs had a complex set of beliefs, ceremonies and gods, each one overlooking an aspect of human life...
Site Formation Processes
In archaeology, the term Site Formation Processes refers to the events that created an archaeological site.
Why Did Shihuangdi Need a Terracotta Army?
The exquisite terracotta army of the first Qin Dynasty ruler Shihuangdi represents the emperor’s ability to control the resources of the newly unified China, and his attempt to recreate and maintain that empire in the afterlife.
Ancient Maya Bloodletting Rituals
Bloodletting rituals and sacrifices were a widespread practice among the ancient people of Mesoamerica.
Caral: The Earliest Civilization in the New World
A collection of sites in the Supe Valley of Peru are proving to be the ancestral source of the Inca and other later civilizations of South and Central America. Caral and the other Supe Valley sites promise to teach us why people choose to become urban dwellers.
Aztec Sacrifices
The Aztecs, or more properly the Mexica, practiced several different types of ritual sacrifice to secure the benevolence of the gods.
What did Cleopatra and Alexander the Great have...
The Ptolemies were members of the final dynasty of Egyptian pharaohs, members of a Greek family based in Alexandria.
Archaeology is the Study of ... What?
What is Archaeology? The study of archaeology has been defined in a number of silly and serious ways. Here's a collection of pithy quotes from archaeologists and non-archaeologists.
Did the Ancient Inca Keep Their Records in...
The ancient Inca empire ruled much of South America when the Spanish conquistadors arrived in the 16th century AD, and they did it all without a written language. But did they?
Chaac
Chaac, was the Mayan god of rain, water and lightning. His origins are very ancient and he was worshiped all over the Maya area...
Ancient Art Sculpture on a Very Grand Scale
Megalithic structures are immense collections of stone, earth and wood, some of which were built during the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods of Europe.
What Occurred During the Middle Paleolithic...
The Middle Paleolithic period (ca 200,000 to 45,000 years ago or so) is the period during which Archaic humans including Homo sapiens neanderthalensis appeared and flourished all over the world.
Monumental Architecture
Monumental architecture refers to large man-made structures of stone or earth.
Characteristics of Ancient Civilizations
Archaeologists recognize that in some cases, in some places, at some times, simple societies for one reason and another morph into more and more complex societies, and some become civilizations.
What Scientists Have Learned about the Ancient...
Cave art refers to paintings, murals, drawings, etchings, carvings, and pecked artwork on the interior of rockshelters and caves.
Cultural Resource Management
Cultural Resource Management is, essentially, a process by which the protection and management of the multitudinous but scarce elements of cultural heritage are given some consideration in a modern world with an expanding population and changing needs.
Processual Archaeology
Processual Archaeology is the study of process, that is to say, investigations of the way humans do things, and the way things decay.
Moundbuilder Myth
The lost race or moundbuilder myth is one created by incoming European settlers of the North American continent who could not, or did not want to, believe that the mounds had been built by the Native American peoples they were displacing.
Multiregional Hypothesis
The Multiregional Hypothesis argues that our earliest hominid ancestors radiated out from Africa and Homo sapiens evolved from several different groups of Homo erectus in several places throughout the world.
Aztlán, The Mythical Homeland of the...
Aztlan is the mythical homeland from which the Aztec/Mexica migrated to the Valley of Mexico in the 13th century.
What You Need to Know About the Early Stone Age
The Lower Paleolithic period (2.7 million to 200,000 years ago) is the first archaeology, that is to say, that period when the first evidence of what scientists consider human behaviors occurred.
Abu Hureyra (Syria)
Abu Hureyra is the ruins of an ancient settlement, located on the south side of the Euphrates valley of northern Syria, where the earliest evidence of cultivated plants has been identified, some 11,000 radiocarbon years before the present.
Three Cultural Groups which Combined to Make...
A military and political pact formed by the Aztec of Tenochtitlan and other two cities of the Valley of Mexico. This is when the Aztec Empire began.
Aztec Creation Myth
The story of how the Aztecs believe world originated, passed down by oral tradition, incorporating gods and myths adopted and modified from other tribes.
History of Rice, Part One
Archaeology has traced the history of rice to nearly 12,000 years ago.
How Do Scientists Know They Found Richard III?
A summary of the scientific evidence supporting the identification of a 500-year-old skeleton as Richard III, the controversial king of England.
Archaic Period
The Archaic period is the name given to generalized hunter-gatherer societies in the North American continent from approximately 8000 to 2000 years BP.
An Introduction to Seriation
Seriation is a method archaeologists use to create chronological maps of changes in artifacts over time, and to use those maps to illuminate relative dates of archaeological deposits and sites.
Arrowheads and Projectile Points
Arrowheads are the most identifiable archaeological artifact in the world. Whether they've personally collected them from nearby farmlands, seen them in museum displays or just watched them being shot into people in John Wayne movies, most people know the triangular tips of arrow shafts are the remnants of a hunting trip.
How Archaeologists Conduct Background Research
Background research refers to accessing the collection of previously published and unpublished information about a site, region, or particular topic of interest and it is the first step of all good archaeological investigations, as well as that of all writers of any kind of research paper.
The Science Behind the Ancient Legend of Dilmun
Dilmun was a trading center and perhaps polity, mentioned in the earliest cuneiform records of Mesopotamia, and located on the island of Bahrain.
Who Would Build a House out of Whale Bone--and...
Whale bone houses are typically elite residences or ceremonial buildings, constructed by medieval arctic peoples, most frequently Thule whale hunters.
What Connects Llamas and Alpacas, Vicunas and...
Llamas and alpacas are two different species of camel in South America, both domesticated in about the same location and time in the Andean highlands.
Why Would People Build Permanent Houses of Snow?
Snow houses were temporary residences and winter villages built by arctic peoples at least as long ago as 800 BC: although we can't really be sure.
The Royal Road
The Royal Road was a major intercontinental thoroughfare built by the Achaemenid king Darius the Great (521-485 BC), to allow access to their conquered cities. It is also the road that Alexander the Great used to conquer the Achaemenid dynasty.
Are There Benefits to Slash and Burn Farming?
Slash and burn--also known as swidden or shifting agriculture--is a form of growing crops that involves the rotation of several plots of land.
Pit Houses: Warm in the Winters and Cool in the...
A pit house (also spelled pithouse) is a type of dwelling that was excavated partly into the earth, from a few inches to more than three feet.
Flotation Method
Archaeological flotation involves using water to process soil or feature fill to recover tiny artifacts.
Who Were the Aztecs and Where Did They Live?
Aztecs are the collective name given to seven Chichimec tribes of northern Mexico
Hopewell Civilization
The Hopewell civilization (also called Adena in some regions) is a prehistoric culture of the American middle west.
Çatalhöyük
Catalhoyuk is one of the earliest urban centers in the world; and Ian Hodder's study of its shrines has included the most forward-thinking and vital work in archaeology today.
Cahokia (USA)
. Archaeology.
Archaeology Equipment: The Tools of the Trade
A photo essay of the tools that archaeologists use during the course of an investigation, before, during and after the excavations.
Oracle Bones
Oracle bones are a type of artifact found in archaeological sites from the Shang Dynasty in China.
Angkor or Khmer Empire Ruled Southeast Asia...
The Angkor Civilization (or Khmer Civilization) is the name given to an important civilization of southeast Asia, including all of Cambodia and southeastern Thailand and northern Vietnam
Tunnels, Bridges, Rest Stops and Shrines Along...
The Inca trail system was an essential part of the success of the Inca Empire, which included an estimated 40,000 kilometers of road way
Great Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe)
Great Zimbabwe is an important African Iron Age site, one of hundreds of such sites in Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa dated between the 10th and 15th centuries AD.
Who were the Nasca and why did they draw those...
The Nazca (often spelled Nasca in archaeological texts) civilization was located in the Nasca region as defined by the Ica and Grande river drainages, on the southern coast of Peru between about AD 1-750.
Oasis Theory
The Oasis Theory is a core concept in archaeology, referring to one of the main hypotheses about the origins of agriculture.
What is the first tool ever made by humans?
Acheulean handaxes are a type of stone tool made by our earliest hominid ancestors.
13000 year old burial of a baby in the American...
The Anzick site is a human burial from the Clovis period in the American northwest, dated approximately 12,800 years ago.
You can opt-out at any time. Please refer to our privacy policy for contact information.

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.